Visiting Seattle LFLs

I stayed in Seattle for the weekend recently. I didn’t get to see many Little Free Libraries – I was too busy going to Archie McPhee’s Rubber Chicken Museum and picking up little boxes of art from the sole Art-O-Mat host in the entirety of the state of Washington – but I did get to see one. Maybe two. I’m unclear.

Between errands and visiting, I didn’t really have any time until the very end of my trip. With an hour to kill before boarding my train, I used the Little Library Locator app to see what was nearby. I found one, LFL #11041, inside an Irish-style pub, O’Donnell’s.

The hostess told me they try to keep the library stocked with books on Irish history and travel and such. I highly suspect that they do not lend out anything but the books. play.jpg

I’m not as sure about the other, LFL #17872. Either it’s part of this Seattle Parks “Play” project, or it no longer exists. The project brings a ton of toys and a couple of racks of books to city parks to share with anyone who wants. All of the books I saw had stickers marking them as from this city initiative, so I’m not sure if they’re for giving away or if you have to read them on the premises. I left a couple of children’s books on the rack anyway, just because.

Hoping to see some more Little Free Libraries next trip!

December Author Birthdays

Jan Brett (The Mitten, Berlioz the Bear)  12/1happy birthday pile of books

David Macaulay (The Way We Work, The Way Things Work) 12/2

Christina Rossetti (Goblin Market, Remember) 12/5

Harve Zemach (Duffy and the Devil: A Cornish Tale, Small Boy is Listening) 12/5

Padraic Colum (The King of Ireland’s Son, The Six Who Were Left in a Shoe) 12/8

James Thurber (The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, The Catbird Seat) 12/8

Edward Tunis  (The Tavern at the Ferry, Frontier Living) 12/8

Jerome Beatty (Bob Fulton’s Amazing Soda-Pop Stretcher: An International Spy Story, Maria Looney on the Red Planet) 12/9

Jean de Brunhoff (Babar) 12/9

Joel Chandler Harris (Uncle Remus stories) 12/9

Emily Dickinson (American poet) 12/10

Cornelia Funke (Inkheart trilogy, Dragon Rider, The Thief Lord) 12/10

George MacDonald (Phantases, Devid Elginbrod, Mary Marston) 12/10

Mary Norton (The Borrowers series)  12/10

Ernest Shepard (illustrator for Winnie-the-Pooh, The Modern Struwwelpeter) 12/10

Ben Lucien Burman (Catfish Bend series, The Four Lives of Mundy Tolliver) 12/12

Barbara Emberley (Drummer Hoff) 12/12

Leonard Weisgard (Suki the Siamese Pussy, Whose Little Bird Am I?, Who Dreams of Cheese? ) 12/13

Rosemary Sutcliff (Heroes and History, Eagle of the Ninth series, Warrior Scarlet) 12/14

Ann Nolan Clark (My Mother’s House) 12/15

Quentin Blake (Mrs. Armitage on Wheels, You’re Only Young Twice, Fantasic Daisy Artichoke) 12/16

Arthur C. Clarke (2001: A Space Odyssey, The Songs of Distant Earth, The Coast of Coral) 12/16

Peter Dickinson (Tulku, City of Gold) 12/16

Marie Hall Ets (Nine Days to Christmas, Just Me, In the Forest) 12/16

Marilyn Sachs (The Bears’ House, The Four Ugly Cats in Apartment 3D) 12/18

Eve Bunting (Someone is Hiding on Alcatraz Island, The Summer of Riley, Fly Away Home) 12/19

Eleanor H Porter (Pollyanna, The Story of Marco) 12/19

Richard Atwater (Mr. Popper’s Penguins, Rickety Rhymes of Riq) 12/20

M.B. Goffstein (Fish for Supper) 12/20

William O Steele (The Perilous Road, Wilderness Journey) 12/22

Avi (Abigail Takes the Wheel, Sometimes I Think I Hear My Name) 12/23

(Mary) Noel Streatfield (A Vicarage Family, The Circus is Coming, Shoes series) 12/24

Johnny Gruelle (Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy series) 12/25

Ella Young (The Tangle-Coasted Horse and Other Tales, Marzilian) 12/26

Ingri Parin D’Aulaire (Leif the Lucky, d’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths) 12/27

Diane Stanley (Shaka King of the Zulus, Moe the Dog in Tropical Paradise) 12/27

Carol Ryrie Brink (Caddie Woodlawn, The Pink Motel) 12/28

Molly Bang (The Grey Lady and the Strawberry Snatcher, When Sophie Gets Angry – Really, Really Angry) 12/29

EW Hildick (Jack McGurk series, Ghost Squad series) 12/20

Rudyard Kipling (Just So Stories, Riki-Tiki-Tavi, Gunga Din) 12/30

Mercer Mayer (Little Critter series; A Boy, A Dog, and a Frog; There’s a Nightmare in my Closet) 12/30

Pamela Bianco (Playtime in Cherry Street, The Look-Inside Easter Egg) 12/31

Visiting Other SE PDX Libraries

Here’s another SE Portland little library. This one is one block from the Woodstock New Seasons store. It looks like there was another structure next to it – another library? a little free pantry? a birdhouse?  It doesn’t have an official LFL registration number on it, and I couldn’t find it on the official LFL map.

I love the colors on this one. It’s similar run down LFL.jpgto what I was originally going to paint mine – pumpkin orange, olive green, and eggplant purple. This photo also reminds me I keep meaning to find a cabinet doorknob of some sort and a magnet for mine, instead of the rotating lever style latch.

I’ve passed this library several times. For about a year, I passed it almost weekly, and it was always nearly empty – maybe a few wilted magazines or a couple of damp dog-eared books, and that was about it. I passed it recently,  and it was half-full of books in really good shape. I don’t know if that was a one-time thing or if someone is back to caring for the library. I hope it’s getting used regularly again. It’s in a great spot, so near the Woodstock neighborhood businesses, close enough to the elementary school that it’s got to have walkers and cyclists coming by. The neighborhood is pretty neat too – lots of holiday decorations, good looking yards, and the occasional bit of chalk art on the sidewalks.

 

 

Recent Reads

Books I’ve recently read

Image result for make me lee childMake Me, by Lee Child – I’m a big fan of action books, especially spy/thrillers and police procedurals, and I’m really liking Child’s writing. I’ve read a lot of those, and I’ll freely admit I had not guessed the twist. Looking forward to more of his work.

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Red Dragon, by Thomas Harris – I’ve had this book on my shelf for 20 years, and I finally got around to reading it. In fact, I ended up staying up late reading it without realizing it. I don’t know if I’ll be able to watch the movie – I’m an anti-fan of gross-outs and slashers, so it’ll depend a lot on how the moviemakers decided to handle it. Seriously considering reading the third novel in the set, Manhunter.

Image result for a moveable feast

A Moveable Feast, by Ernest Hemingway – How is it possible, that as an English major, I never read any Hemingway? Maybe one short story. Possibly. But nothing else?  I found this one at the Little Library in one of the grocery stores I frequent and thought what the heck. Apparently I’d misunderstood all the descriptions of his writing I’d seen, too. While he uses fairly spare vocabulary, his sentences and messages are anything but. I find I can only read a short bit before having to stop and take a break from his writing style, but that’s okay. I usually have a couple of books going at once anyway. It’s especially interesting to read right now, having been to Paris this summer. He writes of the Jardin du Luxembourg, and we walked all through it; he strolls along the Boulevard St. Michel, and we walked up and down it, watching the boats on the Seine. In addition to being an interesting recount of his time there – spent with authors I’m familiar with too – t’s an especially nice reminder of that trip.Image result for serenity the shepherd's tale

Serenity: The Shepherd’s Tale – I can’t remember where I got this one. Maybe from a friend who went to a Comic Con, maybe from Michael’s Firefly Loot Crate. It took me a bit to adapt to the narrative style, and I don’t know that it actually answered any of the questions I’d had about this character from Firefly, but it was a good read and did provide some interesting info on his backstory. Plus it was a good reminder to find some more graphic novels.

Image result for lab girl hope jahrenLab Girl, by Hope Jahren – autobiography/memoir of Dr. Hope Jahren, geochemist & geobiologist that’s as much memoir as it is some of the best scientific writing for the layperson I’ve seen in a while. Wikipedia says this better than I can:

Jahren is an advocate for raising public awareness of science and has been working to lift the stereotype surrounding women and girls in science. One such example included the repurposing of the Twitter hashtag#ManicureMondays.  Seventeen magazine originally came up with the hashtag, but focused mainly on manicured and painted fingernails. Subsequently, Jahren encouraged fellow scientists, specifically girls, to tweet pictures of their hands conducting scientific experiments. The idea behind this was to raise awareness of scientific research and to increase the profile of women working in science.

Jahren has also written compellingly about the sexual harassment of women in science. She recommends that people draw strong professional boundaries, and that they carefully document what occurs, beginning with the first occasion of harassment.

Anyone who’s been read the “About” link on this site or my Recent Reads posts will know I’m a fan of biographies. This book did not disappoint. She writes about the best parts, the worst parts, and all the realities along the spectrum, of being a woman in the self-perpetuating male-dominated world of science, as well as how this country supports (not) and values (not) science, especially when there’s no sellable or weaponizable product to show for the work put in.

 

What are you reading these days? What do you think of it?

Poem of the Month: Who Said It Was Simple?

Who Said It Was Simple? by Audre Lorde

 

There are so many roots to the tree of anger
that sometimes the branches shatter
before they bear.

Sitting in Nedicks
the women rally before they march
discussing the problematic girls
they hire to make them free.
An almost white counterman passes
a waiting brother to serve them first
and the ladies neither notice nor reject
the slighter pleasures of their slavery.
But I who am bound by my mirror
as well as my bed
see causes in colour
as well as sex

and sit here wondering
which me will survive
all these liberations.

Visiting other SE PDX Libraries

Here’s the little library at the New Seasons store on SE woodstock new seasons LFLWoodstock and SE 46th. Not an official LFL, but a lovely little community book-&-game shelf. A shelf of adult books, a shelf of kid books, and some games, along with the usual free magazines & newspapers. This shelf is upstairs in the “Tree House”, where you can sit and drink or eat indoors and outside. There’s even a bar up there.  Pretty spiffy, having a little library – letting people know they are welcome not just to shop, but to hang out. Occasionally, there is live music, story time for kids, and a couple of different regular meet-ups sponsored by New Seasons that change through the year, along with groups that just happen to meet there.

Thanks, New Seasons!

Reading Style

I was reading Lee Child’s “Make Me” recently and came across his description of the main character’s reading style. He seems like a prime candidate for Little Free reacher's reading style.jpgLibrary patronage.

What kind of reading habits do your favorite or recently-read fiction characters have?