Drag Queen Storytime!

Drag Queen Storytime with Poison Waters!

When

Sat, Mar 09, 2019
2:00 to 3:00

Where

Woodstock Library Poison Waters

First come, first served.

The library is proud to present an hour of kid-friendly drag! Join us for this special storytime featuring the fabulous Poison Waters reading stories about inclusion and diversity, followed by a craft or dance party.

For kids 2-6 years old with a favorite adult.

 

for more info, click here

Drag Queen Story Time!

Drag Queen Storytime with Carla Rossi!

When

Sat, Mar 09, 2019
2:00 to 3:00

Where

U.S. Bank Room – Central LibraryCarla Rossi

Free tickets available 30 minutes in advance.

Photo by Gia Goodrich

The library is proud to present an hour of kid-friendly drag! Join us for storytime featuring our fabulous queen, Carla Rossi, reading stories about inclusion and diversity, followed by a dance party.

For kids 2-6 years old with a favorite adult.

for more info, click here

Storytimes at MultCo Libraries

Multnomah County Libraries host a variety of children’s storytimes across their Image result for multnomah county library storytimeneighborhood libraries. They typically include stories read aloud, singing/fingerplays, and sometimes a craft or other activity. You can find storytimes for babies, toddlers, preschoolers, kids with sensory challenges (kids who have a hard time with noises or textures or proximity to others, or kids who need to be movingmovingmoving all the time, etc). Image result for multnomah county sensory library storytimeYou can also find storytimes presented in English, Spanish, Mandarin, Vietnamese, and Russian. Most storytimes are presented regularly – weekly, monthly, or whatever. Check the website or with your library for the schedules.

Short Story and Movie Night

The invitation read something like this:

I want to do more reading, and I want to do more socializing. But Book Club is too haaard! I don’t have time to read a whooole book! Talking about books for two hours is boooring!

Let’s read a short story then watch a movie based on it instead!

Read the story ahead of time. Then come over and hang out with us. I’ll have something dinner-like available. Feel free to bring food/drink to share as well, if you like.

The emphasis was on the social aspect – the short story and movie give us a reason to get together and stuff to talk about.

This month’s story & movie was Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

Image result for breakfast at tiffany's bookWhile I’d seen parts of the movie, I’d never read the story. In fact, I’ve never read any Truman Capote before this. I got the four-story collection from the library and read it all. While the writing it good, I can’t say I’m dying to read more of it. Maybe it’s a matter of cultural shifts and no-longer-relevant references. It was hard to get past the overt racism of several characters. I may try to read “In Cold Blood” just because.

 

Image result for breakfast at tiffany's

No one else in the group had watched the movie before, so we’re all watching it several decades after it was made. Again, lots of no-longer-relevant cultural references, lots of cultural shifts.

We were all properly horrified by Mickey Rooney’s character, found everyone else in the movie pretty much unsympathetic, pondered whether Marilyn Monroe (Truman Capote’s choice for the lead) would have been a better choice than Audrey Hepburn, wondered why Hannibal Smith was in this movie without the rest of the A-Team, were glad to have seen it for the overall cultural reference, loved pretty much all of Audrey Hepburn’s clothing, and we thought Cat was easily the best actor.  We had a great time talking about the differences between the story and the movie, and which movies and stories these reminded us of.  Also: what genre is this movie?  Definitely not a romance. Redemption? Drama? Screwball drama?

Dinner was chicken enchiladas (per “chicken and sauce” in the movie) and margaritas (just because).

Image may contain: people sitting, indoor and food

And of course, I’ve had this song stuck in my head for two weeks straight.

The next Short Story and Movie night is already scheduled!

 

 

Short Stories/Short Edition

I ran across a piece a few months ago about short story dispensers, made and distributed by the French company, Short Édition. Yes, short stories dispensed by a machine – for free. You can choose between stories that take about 1 minute, 3 minutes, or 5 minutes to read.

After tucking away the bookmark to that article somewhere safe, I promptly forgot about it till today.

I looked up the company’s website. You don’t even have to find a dispensing machine to read the short stories – you can read them on the website if you want, or even have them emailed to you!

I’d love to find a dispensing machine in person. Unfortunately, there’s none near me. I checked the map pretty carefully. And what little travel I’ve got planned so far doesn’t take me near any machines either.

If anyone is interested in a short story machine, they’re looking for hosts- looks like it could possibly be a good bit of advertising for a business or organization as well. They can help customize the collection of stories to fit your purpose too – feature local-ish authors, have a hotel dispense bedtime stories, a school or youth-oriented business/organization could feature children’s stories, and so on. You’ll have to go to the Public Library Association’s website for specifics.

Image result for short edition dispenser machine

It also looks like Short Édition is working on how to have English-speaking authors be able to submit their work for consideration – watch the website for more information.

 

disclaimer – I have no affiliation with Short Édition or any of it’s machine hosts. I just think this is an awesome idea, and I hope more organizations will choose to host these or something similar. 

Image result for short edition dispenser machine

Featured in the library this MONTH: Book/Movie tie-ins

While going through the stash of donations, I noticed there were a number of books that had been turned into movies. Cold, blustery nights seem like a great time to curl up with warm drinks, warm blankets, good books, and good movies.

Whether you read the book first or watch the movie first – that is a good question. None of the books in this collection are new – they’ve all been out as both books and movies for a while. But maybe you haven’t seen the movie yet. Woo! You still have a chance to read the book first! Maybe you have already seen the movie. You can still read the book, then watch the movie again!

Here are some of the book/movie tie-ins featured this month in the Division92 Little Free Library:

Great Expectations, Kite Runner, Sense & Sensibility, Snow Falling on Cedars, The Girl on the Train, Under the Tuscan Sun, Up in the Air

Which books have you already read? Which movies have you already seen?

 

6 Reasons the Book is Almost Always Better Than the Movie

Listen to the podcast Book Vs Movie

Especially relevant to writers – 5 Important Ways Storytelling is Different in Books vs Movies

A blog breaking down individual book/movie pairs – Book vs Movie

What book/movie pairs did you love both of? What pairs did you like or love one but not the other?  I really like the movie Bladerunner, and I wasn’t nearly so crazy about the story. I also saw the movie first, so that may have something to do with it. I loved Wizard of Oz as a book, and while I liked the movie, I’ve never really re-watched it. I enjoyed reading Romeo and Juliet in a high school English class – I really liked the class, so that made it even easier to enjoy reading the play. I watched the movie, with Olivia Hussey in class at the end of the R&J unit, with the requisite class discussion afterward, so I was predisposed to enjoy that whole activity as well.

Are you more of a read-the-book-before-watching-the-movie sort of person or more of a doesn’t-matter-whichever-opportunity-comes-up-first sort of person? Let us know in the comments!