Your Kids Can Now Watch Astronauts Reading Stories From Space

Your Kids Can Now Watch Astronauts Reading Stories From Space

by Sarah Aswell at ScaryMommy

 

IMAGE VIA GLOBAL SPACE EDUCATION FOUNDATION/YOUTUBE

Reading to kids is wonderful and everything, but reading to kids from space is super awesome

If you need to mix up your bedtime story routine a little bit, the Global Space Education Foundation has just the thing for you: Story Time in Space.  It’s exactly what it sounds like — astronauts on various missions in space read popular children’s books while floating about, and the videos are edited and shared with kids way down on Earth.

The results are adorable as well as educational and inspiring. Check out astronaut Kathleen Rubins reading Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty and try not to get choked up at how amazing this all is.

The concept was developed by Patricia Tribe, the former director of education at Space Center Houston, and Alvin Drew, the first NASA astronaut to read a story in space for the program, during the final mission of the space shuttle Discovery. The pair were looking to find a way to encourage reading among kids while also promoting STEM education, and landed on the idea of having on-duty astronauts reading science-based kids’ books, gravity-free.

Since the initial reading, all of the story times have taken place on the International Space Station, as it hurtles through nothingness at 17,500 miles per hour around the planet. It’s only a guess, but this may be slightly more interesting than your kids listening to you feign excitement while reading The Mitten again.

“What better role models to engage kids in science and to engage them in reading?” Tribe told the Huffington Post. “You’re not only looking and listening to the books, you’re looking around the International Space Station.”

Astronaut @Tim Peake tweeted from the ISS about his reading of The Incredible Intergalactic Journey Home by Lost My Name book that he has read for us!
“I enjoyed reading this “Story Time” for the kids- my boys will like this too 
check out the pic!!! So excited!

Not only are does Story Time in Space aim to make reading out of this world, it also stresses the importance of diversity. Tribe and her team select books for a wide range of reading levels (though all can be read in 15 minutes or less) and from a wide range of STEM topics, from physics to engineering to biology. The group also selects a diverse set of astronauts to read the books, so that kids can see that people who look just like them can reach for the next frontier. For example, Japanese engineer and JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata read Max Goes to the International Space Station in Japanese for the program this summer.

The Story Time from Space program is also expanding. The group is working on adding a set of nine simple science experiments for kids that were conducted from the space station, involving concepts like energy transfer and surface tension. In addition, more books are on the way, including A Moon of My Own by Jennifer Rustgi, The Rhino Who Swallowed A Storm by LeVar Burton and Susan Schaefer Bernardo, and Moustronaut by Astronaut Mark Kelly.

While those projects are being completed, Earthlings can enjoy the rest of the collection, which includes Max Goes to Mars, by Jeffrey Bennet, as read by astronaut Mike Hopkins.

Let’s just hope that these awesome videos don’t ruin regular books read in gravity, from the ground, by plain old mom who probably isn’t even an astronaut.

Spinning a Yarn? Nope, Crocheting It!

I saw this piece on BookRiot about “Literary Crochet” recently. Amigurumi, the Japanese art of knitting or crocheting stuffed dolls and animals, has been around a while, and of course crocheting blankets and scarves has been around much longer. I’m also pretty sure it’s a law that if you have two or more hobbies or interests, you *must* combine them at some point. Therefore, it was inevitable that we would see our favorite scenes and characters show up in crochet eventually.

On a recent trip to etsy.com, for Paddington Bear alone, you can find aimage 0 finished crochet bear, a pattern for a bear and his clothes, and a finished blanket with 3D effect.

 

 

Paddington not your thing? What about a pattern for Star-Bellied Sneetches, from Dr. Seuss?

Have a younger child, or fond memories of board books? catclose1smallMake your own Very Hungry Caterpillar, to play with or wear!

 

 

Fond of Young Adult works? How about Rob Anybody from Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series?  Maybe Le Petit Prince is more your style?

Ah, you adult-fiction readers!  For you, we have all sorts of grown-up crochet! From Gandalf (and Gandalf) and Gollum to Game of Thrones. (Along with Goodnight, Moon of course!)

Image result for captain ahab crochetCheck out these pictures and patterns

Literary Crochet, from #AmReading

10 Lovely Literary Crochet Patterns, from BookRiot

Literary Yarns: Crochet Patterns Inspired By Classic Books, by Cindy Wang — and if you want to see more of Cindy’s work, check out her blog!

Make your own Captain Ahab right now!

I’d love to see what you decide to make!

 

 

Featured in the library this week

This week the Division92 Little Free Library is featuring the songbooks of Sandra Boynton. You probably know her best from her massively popular card:

Image result for hippo birdies two ewes card

Did you know she also writes (and co-writes) children’s songs?  And convinces hugely popular celebrities to sing them? We’re putting out her first three songbooks. Unfortunately, the CDs are missing from each of the books. HOWEVER!  You can find the songs on YouTube! For instance:

Where else can you hear Kate Winslet & Weird Al Yankovic singing a duet? When was the last time you heard Scott Bakula sing?  What other album contains performances by both Hootie & the Blowfish AND Steve Lawrence & Eydie Gorme?

IMG_9329.jpg

 

Short Story & Movie Night: It Had to be Murder/Rear Window

Tonight was the second installment of Short Story & Movie Night. We read the short story Image result for it had to be murder cornell woolrichIt Had to be Murder by Cornell Woolrich. About 13 pages long, there’s not a lot of mystery to it, but it’s a good solid basic murder story.

Then we got together and watched Rear Window, with Jimmy Stewart, Grace Kelly, and Raymond Burr.

Again, three of the four of us hadn’t seen the movie before, and none of us had read the story before.

Image result for rear windowThe film definitely kept most of the story’s elements, and what it changed, we all felt changed for the better. The two female characters in the movie didn’t exist in the story, and added a great deal to the film – in no small part because they were living breathing human characters, and not just “sexy lamps” or “dark action girl“. Because of their addition, some of the action from the story got rearranged, but it still all fell nicely into place. (and do I even need to start about Grace Kelly or her character’s wardrobe? *swoon*)  We all quite liked the film – thumbs up all around!

Tonight’s tie-in dinner was eggs (scrambled, with cheese), bacon, toast, and coffee (well, coffee cocktail), per both the story and the movie. Mostly because I wasn’t up to dealing with lobster and pommes frites.

Looking forward to next month’s Short Story & Movie Night!

Drag Queen Storytime!

Drag Queen Storytime with Poison Waters!

When

Sat, Mar 09, 2019
2:00 to 3:00

Where

Woodstock Library Poison Waters

First come, first served.

The library is proud to present an hour of kid-friendly drag! Join us for this special storytime featuring the fabulous Poison Waters reading stories about inclusion and diversity, followed by a craft or dance party.

For kids 2-6 years old with a favorite adult.

 

for more info, click here